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A-7B CORSAIR II USN MODEL

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Part# 13-10623
MFR Model# CA07NTE

Overview

The A-7 Corsair II is a carrier-based subsonic light attack aircraft and was one of the first combat aircraft produced by Chance Vought.

The A-7 was one of the first combat aircraft featuring a head-up display (HUD), doppler-bounded inertial navigation system and a turbofan engine. The A-7 first entered service with the US Navy during the Vietnam conflict and was then adopted by the United States Air Force. The A-7 Corsair II was nicknamed as ""SLUF"" (Short Little Ugly Feller) by pilots. The A-7s were used as a deception aircraft by the group between 1981 and 1989. The A-7B has a general ease of flying and excellent forward visibility but lacks in engine thrust. The A-7B incorporates a TF30-P-8 engine with 12,190 lbf of thrust.

An A-7 donated from the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola Florida is located on the side of the road just outside Lake City, Florida. An A-7 can also be found at at Akron-Canton airport hangar at MAPS air museum in Akron, Ohio. There is also one mounted at the Atlanta Road side of Naval Air Station Atlanta in Marietta, Georgia. Another A-7 is on display at Tillamook Air Museum and another A-7 is located behind a fence in the parking lot of the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville, Oregon. There were many A-7s which survived. In 1971, A-7Bs which survived were further upgraded to TF30-P-408 with 13,390 lbf of thrust and there were 196 A-7Bs built.

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