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F-5E Tiger II Model

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Part# 13-10664
MFR Model# CF005T2T

Overview

The F-5E Tiger II is a single-seat version for the Tunisian Air Force.

In 1950, the F-5 started its life as a privately-funded light fighter program by Northrop. The first generation F-5A Freedom Fighter entered service in 1960. During the Cold War, there were over 800 produced through 1972 for US Allies. The F-5 proved to be a successful combat aircraft for US Allies, but it didnt entered front-line service with the US due to diverging priorities of the US services. A few surplus F-5As and F-5Es have been sold to private owners.

In 1970, Northrops F-5A-21, which subsequently became the F-5E, was designated to replace the F-5A. It was lengthened and enlarged, with increased wing area and more sophisticated avionics, and was initially having an Emerson AN/APQ-153 radar. The F-5E eventually acquired its official name Tiger II. In its service life, the F-5E experienced numerous upgrades. The F-5E Tiger II has a crew capacity of 1. It has a maximum speed of 917 kn and a ferry range of 2,010 nmi.

The F-5E Tiger II production amounted to 1,400 including all versions and production ended in 1987. Various F-5 versions remain in service with many other nations. Singapore has approximately 49 modernized and re-designated F-5S and F-5T aircraft. The F-5 was also developed into a reconnaissance version, the RF-5 Tigereye.

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