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PLANE-POWER FLYSAFE ALTERNATOR FS1-14

$1099.00/Each
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Part# 07-01857
MFR Model# FS1-14

Overview

Back up alternator, internally regulated (13.6 volt +-0.3) with built-in overvoltage protection. Designed for use in experimental aircraft. FS1-14

Also available as a primary unit sold as model FS1-14B

Features

  • 30A continuous output
  • Precision internal voltage regulator
  • Fail-safe Over Voltage Protection
  • Shear Coupling Assembly
  • 6lbs installed weight
  • Higher level of safety

Specifications

  • 2-Year Limited Warranty
  • Weight: 6 Pounds
  • 12 volt/30 amp

Reviews

****** I submitted this yesterday and you posted it but I found a few typos. Here is the corrected version if you want to repost it. Thanks. Also it reads easier if you keep the paragraphs separated. ******** How these work. It mounts to the vacuum pad if you dont have a vacuum system but have an all electric airplane which is how most glass cockpit airplanes are configured. It is tied into your main bus just like the main alternator is using a separate 30A circuit breaker. It is internally regulated and it it senses the main bus voltage and just sits there and basically idles when your main alternator is putting out normal voltage. If your main alternator dies it senses the drop in bus voltage then the internal regulator of the back up alternator turns on the backup alternator and it then powers the bus. You can also make it switched by using a switch or use the CB to the bus as a switch and use the switch to bring the back up alternator on manually if you want. It is basically a one wire hook up to the main bus. This is by far probably the best single safety back up system you can put on your airplane for anyone that is flying real IMC in a light aircraft. So your glass panel has a back up battery? How long will it really last if your are in IMC and your alternator dies? Your entire IMC world depends on electrical power to get you onto the runway. Will all your glass stay powered right down to minimums? What if you forget to pull all the breakers for the nonessential electrical items. How long will your main battery last if you have to run pitot heat and all your nav/com radios, transponder and other electrical items? If you deplete your main battery first but still have your EFIS system battery are you still ok? What if your nav/coms and GPS are powered only by the main battery? It wont do any good to have your glass if you cant navigate. What if all you have is a working EFIS attitude display but the rest of your airplane is electrically dead because you main battery is now dead? What ya gonna do, call Ghost Busters? For those systems that advertise 30 minutes of back up or even 45, do you think you can find a suitable airport with good weather and an approach you can fly and get it on the ground in that amount of time? Will you have enough battery power to land at night in IMC if you turn your landing lights on during the approach or will everything go dark at 500agl on the approach? You are IMC, at night in crappy weather. Your alternator dies. Your best IMC friend Otto the Pilot will suddenly become more of a liability than an asset because he uses a whole lot of that main battery reserve to help you fly the airplane. What if you lose Otto and ALL of your other main electrical items that are running off your battery only? By the way, what kind of condition is your main battery in? How old is it? Was it a little weak cranking today? Is your electrical system really being powered mostly by your alternator? Will your main battery really have the reserve its advertised for if its 5 or 8 or 10 years old? All that leaves you at that point is attitude and an engine that is running good. How long will you have the attitude reference if you cant navigate because your navs and GPS are unpowered? Youre having a bad day when.................. Oh yes, you definitely need this. This is 100% the ultimate real definition of Its Better to Have it and not Need it than to Need it and Not have it.

Kurt M
May 20, 2021

After waiting about 9 months for this unit to be produced, I am thoroughly satisfied with the product. The folks at Plane Power are great to deal with, and I received stellar service from them. Note that if you have the 90 degree oil filter adapter installed, you need a oil adapter spacer no thicker than 0.75 inches. I had the 1.4 inch spacer and had to change it out due to interference between the alternator and spacer.

Normand G
April 12, 2020

Q&A

Q: How long is this Plane Power FlySafe FS1-14 alternator?

Per the supplier: From base of mount 6-1/2" and add another 1-1/2" for the harness plug on top.

Q: What's the width of this unit?

Per the manufacturer: the width of this alternator is 4.62"

Q: Is this Plane Power Flysafe alternator FS1-14 FAA Approved?

No, this alternator is intended for use experimental aircraft.

Q: You might want to note that this will only mount to a vacuum pad on Lyc or Cont engines. It will not mount to the unused accessory drive adapter pad.

Thank you for advising us of this. We will post this Q+A for other customer's reference.

Q: There is a comment in the Q&A section about inability to mount the alternator on accessory drive pad. Is that verified by Plane Power or Lycoming? I see both pads are AND20000/MS3325. It should be possible to install on acc pad if it is not plugged (has the correct spline gear in)

The FS14 will mount to the pad but may run into interference with other accessories.

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